What to Do About Scorched Plants

Like many gardeners in Minnesota, I’ve been discovering crispy, browning leaves on my plants—the new hydrangeas I’m testing, winterberries that have been in the ground for years, green beans. Are these scorched plants due to the heatwave we’ve had in June? Or are they symptoms of disease? And, what should a gardener do about them?…

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Tips for Heatwave Gardening

Normally, we’re all about the tips for gardening in the cold and extending the season. But with a week or more of 90-plus degree temperatures, we decided to investigate the best tips for heatwave gardening. The forecast for the Twin Cities calls for temperatures in the 90s through Thursday—with similar highs throughout the state, with…

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Garden Solution: Spider Mites

This article by Laura Schwarz first appeared in the January/February 2019 edition of the Northern Gardener  Populations of spider mites go up and down from year to year. In 2018, for example, an abnormally dry summer led to large numbers of the pests. In both my home garden and in the many gardens I tended…

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Vegetables You Can Plant Now

As the first part of the vegetable garden season winds down, harvest holes may start appearing in your garden. These are the spots where you pulled a beautiful head of lettuce or where the peas have finished up and there’s a space open. How do you fill those holes? Which vegetables can you plant now?…

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Three Ways to Determine When to Plant

With our erratic springs—70 one day, 30 the next—it’s often a challenge to figure out when to plant your vegetables or ornamental plants. Most experienced gardeners use a variety of ways to determine when to plant their crops. Here are three we’ve tried: By Frost Free Dates. Most seed packets will include a recommended seed…

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What’s a Gardener To Do?

It looks like we are all facing a few weeks  of restricted social activity due to the COVID-19 virus. We’ve seen several memes around social media saying “Your Garden is NOT Closed,” or something similar, and that is sure true. During this forced period of home-time, here are a few things for a gardener to…

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Spotlight: Koehler & Dramm

This article by Diane Duvall originally appeared in the September/October issue of Northern Gardener. MSHS and Koehler and Dramm’s Institute of Floristry value their shared history of inspiring beautiful creations with plants. So, when MSHS was looking for a sponsor for the popular Make and Take class series in 2019, Koehler and Dramm was the…

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Help Us Harvest a Challenge Grant

This October, a longtime supporter and member of MSHS has challenged us to raise up to $5,000 to support the society and its work connecting young people to gardening and food security. Your donations, which will be matched dollar for dollar up to $5,000 in this challenge grant, drive valuable MSHS programs that bring plants,…

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Your Garden Can Be Wild and Neat

Claudia West might be considered a garden revolutionary. With co-author Thomas Rainier, West argues in Planting in a Post Wild World (Timber Press, 2015) that trying to re-create nature precisely in our backyards is a futile endeavor. Instead gardeners who also care about the environment should design gardens filled with plant communities that enhance each…

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Book Review: Emma Bee

During the Minnesota State Fair, Duluth author Pamela Fish Carlson visited our booth and signed copies of her new children’s book, Emma Bee (Beaver Pond Press, 2019). Pam and her book were a big hit with fairgoers, especially those with children in their lives. Emma Bee is the story of a young honeybee, heading out…

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