Planting for Pollinators

Planting for pollinators… the concept was just a blip on the radar a few years ago. Now it’s a nationwide trend, only growing in popularity. When we think about pollinator conservation, we often look at restoring large swaths of habitat by adding native prairie plants—the vibrant collections of flowers and native grasses insects rely on…

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Celebrating National Pollinator Week

celebrating pollinator week

Planting for pollinator habitat as our climate changes is so important—we have the opportunity to adapt our cultivated environments to make room for more native pollinators. Researchers are learning more every day about how these essential creatures survive and thrive. During this National Pollinator Week, we’re shining a bright spotlight on this important work and…

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7 Plants to Attract Bumble Bees to the Garden

bumblebee on coneflower

Honey bees get a lot of attention and credit as hardworking pollinators, and we all understand the benefits of keeping a hive or two of honey bees near the garden. But amidst all the buzz about honey bees, we sometimes overlook the contributions of the humble bumble bee to the success of our gardens. There’s…

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Ode to Fathers in the Garden

Rick and son in the garden

Here’s to fathers who garden. To dads who get their hands dirty. To papas with patience for impatiens. To old farmers who can taste the soil to know what it needs, and young parents who eagerly identify native grasses with their phone app. We are changing the world and changing ourselves. We are teaching our…

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A Seasonal Schedule for Northern Gardener Magazine

“Northern Gardener is here!”  My wife and I, together with our 17,000+ readers, eagerly await each bold splash of color, expertise and inspiration in our mailboxes.  In 2023, Northern Gardener will shift to four print publications plus one shorter online supplement. This is based on feedback from member surveys, researching other publications and extensive analysis.…

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150 Tips: Growing Roses in the North

In a 1916 article on roses, Martin Frydholm of Albert Lea promised rose gardeners “work and lots of it,” if they wanted to grow tea roses in the North. Over the 150 years that MSHS has been publishing gardening articles, advice on growing roses has changed a lot. But one thing has remained the same:…

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What to Do in the Garden Now

Time to get those warm-season crops in the ground! Transplant tomatoes, peppers and eggplant seedlings and starts. Direct seed beans, okra, melons, squash and cucumbers. Plant more quick succession plants like lettuces, arugula, beets, carrots, radishes, cilantro and dill. (Wondering what to grow in your first vegetable garden? We have tips.) Resilient tomato plants push new…

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The Seeds of Vandana Shiva

Join us for a unique opportunity to view The Seeds of Vandana Shiva in Minneapolis with leaders in the local seed and food sovereignty movement. Together, we can ensure that everyone has access to healthy foods grown with seed diversity by farmers who know and care for their land. Doors open at 6 p.m. on…

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Native Plant List from Eloise Butler

In 1912, Eloise Butler encouraged members of the Minnesota State Horticultural Society to plant more native trees, shrubs and perennial flowers. She offered a long list, suggesting that there were native options for just about any garden. Here are the trees and shrubs she loved. The full article is available from the Minnesota Reflections archives.…

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150 Tips: Peonies for the North

Brand Peonies, Minnesota’s first peony breeding operation, opened in Faribault, MN, in 1868, just two years after the founding of MSHS. Peonies have been a part of Minnesota gardens and horticultural history every since! The state is still home base for several peony specialty nurseries and breeding operations because out climate is perfect for peonies.…

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